New CBT Nuggets Course: Palo Alto Networks 8.x

February 5, 2019 at 4:10 pm

Palo Alto

CBT Nuggets trainer Keith Barker released his new Palo Alto Networks 8.x course, which prepares learners to configure and manage Palo Alto’s next-generation firewall.

While the Getting Started with Palo Alto Firewalls 8.x and Using Palo Alto v8.x Advanced Features courses don’t map directly to certification, they can be a resource in assisting IT professionals preparing for Palo Alto Networks certification exams including:

  • Accredited Configuration Engineer (ACE)
  • Palo Alto Networks Certified Network Security Administrator (PCNSA)
  • Palo Alto Networks Certified Network Security Engineer (PCNSE)

This course covers these topics:

  • Configuring interfaces, security zones, rules, and NAT
  • Using traffic logs to verify network activity
  • Managing security policies

This course includes:

  • 51 videos
  • In-video quiz questions

Two Minute Tip – Using the AWS Free Tier!

November 3, 2018 at 11:01 am


Pearson Education (InformIT)

Subscribe to my New and Improved YouTube Channel!

February 4, 2018 at 2:23 pm

YouTube

Please consider visiting my new and improved YouTube channel and subscribe. 

Starting in 2018 there will be more videos posted than ever before on IT Certification topics you might be interested in.

New and improved features of the channel include:

  • Reorganized and targeted playlists
  • Saved killer playlists from CBT Nuggets that you can access conveniently from my channel
  • Featured channels and subscriptions that will interest you
  • Responsive discussions to answer any questions you might have on video content

Please enjoy and consider subscribing today!

 

What’s New and What’s Coming from CBT Nuggets

October 3, 2017 at 10:53 pm

CBT Nuggets

We are always creating new content for you here at CBT Nuggets. Here is your October News Flash with the details! In an act of shameless self-promotion, I listed my courses in BOLD. What would you like to see from CBT Nuggets? Let me know in the comments area below this post.

JUST RELEASED

  • Ansible Essentials
  • AWS Certified SysOps Administrator – Associate
  • CompTIA Security+ (SY0-501)
  • Installation, Storage, and Compute with Windows Server 2016 (Exam 70-740)
  • IT Expertise: Building and Configuring a Business Switch Network
  • Microsoft Teams
  • Salesforce Admin – Classic Interface
  • Soft Skills for ScrumMasters
  • VMware vSphere 6.5 (VCP6.5-DCV)
  • Windows 10 End User Essentials

IN DEVELOPMENT

  • End User Security Awareness
  • Designing and Operating Defensible Network Architectures
  • Agile Essentials
  • IT Expertise: Building and Configuring a Business Wireless Network
  • CompTIA Cloud Essentials (CLO-001)
  • Microsoft MCSA SQL Server 2016 70-761
  • Everything Linux
  • Microsoft Azure 70-533 with ARM Updates

Security Identifiers (SID) in Active Directory

March 12, 2017 at 11:45 am

SID

Here is post on the SID in AD serving as a great primer for my Identity in Windows Server 2016 course at CBT Nuggets.

SID Overview

In our post here at the blog on the important FSMO roles, we examined the RID Master. This device helps with the creation of unique Security Identifiers (SIDs) in the domain. The SID is used to uniquely identify an object that receives security permissions. A SID consists of several components. One of those components is the Relative Identifier (RID). The RID Master gives your domain controllers each their own portion of the overall RID pool. This keeps different domain controllers from creating and assigning the same SID to different objects in your domain.

The SID Dissected

The Windows SID is generally made up of 2 fixed fields and up to 15 additional fields all separated by dashes. For example, the format looks like this:

S-v-id-s1-s2-s3-s4-s5-s6-s7-s8-s9-s10-s11-s12-s13-s14-s15

Here is the actual SID I am using right now on Windows 10:

S-1-5-21-863435222-3640012759-1033413245-1001

Notice the following about SIDs:

  • The first fixed field (v) describes the version of the SID structure, Microsoft has never changed this from 1
  • The second field (id) is the identifier authority; it uniquely identifies the authority involved; for example, NULL (0), World (1), Local (2), NT Authority (5)
  • The next 15 fields are not all required and are called sub-authorities; they help uniquely identify the object
  • The last sub-authority field is normally the RID

Well-Known SIDs

There are indeed well-known SIDs. For example:

  • S-1-5-10; this represents NT Authority/Self
  • S-1-1-0; this represents Everyone

There is also a well-known RID of 500. This translates to the built-in administrator account. Here we can see this on my Windows 10 system:

SID

I hope you enjoyed this post on the important SIDs in Windows technologies!
Pearson Education (InformIT)