Popular Tags:

CASP+ Practice Quiz 2

July 17, 2019 at 9:10 am

CASP+Enjoy this CompTIA CASP+ practice exam focusing on the supporting of IT governance and risk management! Have fun! Any questions? Use the comments area below!

CASP+ Practice Exam 2

Start
Congratulations - you have completed CASP+ Practice Exam 2. You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%. Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%
Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
678End
Return

CASP+ Practice Quiz 1

July 16, 2019 at 9:08 am

CASP+Enjoy this CompTIA CASP+ practice exam focusing on the supporting of IT governance and risk management! Have fun! Any questions? Use the comments area below!

CASP+ Practice Exam 1

Start

Congratulations - you have completed CASP+ Practice Exam 1.

You scored %%SCORE%% out of %%TOTAL%%.

Your performance has been rated as %%RATING%%


Your answers are highlighted below.
Return
Shaded items are complete.
12345
67End
Return

Learning Python – Lesson 5: More on Numbers and Math

July 9, 2019 at 1:01 am

Python Programming

It’s time to dig deeper into our work with numbers (including math) and strings.

What is Your Type?

First of all, it might be handy (especially as you learning), to have Python report the type of a variable or a literal value. For example:

C:\Users\terry>py
Python 3.7.4 (tags/v3.7.4:e09359112e, Jul  8 2019, 20:34:20) [MSC v.1916 64 bit (AMD64)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> type(199.9)
<class 'float'>
>>> type("Howdy!")
<class 'str'>
>>> type(10043)
<class 'int'>
>>> a = "This is cool!"
>>> type(a)
<class 'str'>
>>>

More on Division

Division in Python comes in two variations:

/ carries out floating point division

// caries out integer (truncating) division

For example:

>>> 15 / 4
3.75
>>> 15 // 4
3

Math Precedence

Many of the math precedence rules would make sense to us (those that took some math in school!) For example, multiplication wins over addition. But fortunately, Python supports the use of ( ) to indicate precedence. This keeps us from having to worry about default behaviors. Here is an example: