Wrapped the Latest BGP Module at CBT Nuggets Today!

September 21, 2018 at 7:39 pm

BGP

That’s right- finished up the last Nugget today for the course below. I will post again here at the blog when the course appears on the CBT Nuggets website next week!

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) – Scalability Mechanisms

  1. Module Introduction
  2. Private AS Numbers
  3. Peer Groups
  4. Session Templates
  5. Policy Templates
  6. IBGP Scalability Issues
  7. Route Reflectors
  8. Advanced Route Reflector Designs
  9. Confederations
  10. Configuring a Confederation
  11. Introduction to BGP Communities
  12. Community Attribute Formats
  13. Well-Known Communities
  14. Extended Communities
  15. Configuring BGP Communities

Remember, this is one more BGP module to complement the existing modules currently on CBT Nuggets:

  • BGP – Basic Operations
  • BGP – Peerings
  • BGP – Advertising NLRI
  • BGP – Cisco Routing Policy Mechanism

CCIE DC Written – 1.1.a Link Aggregation – Overview

September 15, 2018 at 9:08 pm

Port Channels

A port channel is an aggregation of multiple physical interfaces that create a logical interface. You can bundle up to 8 individual active links into a port channel to provide increased bandwidth and redundancy. If a member port within a port channel fails, the traffic previously carried over the failed link switches to the remaining member ports within the port channel.

On the Nexus 7Ks, port channeling also load-balances traffic on the M series module and across these physical interfaces The port channel stays operational as long as at least one physical interface within the port channel is operational.

Starting with the Cisco NX-OS Release 5.1, you can bundle up to 16 active links into a port channel on the F-series module with a Nexus 7K.

NOTE: You cannot configure a shared interface to be part of a port channel.

Like many later Cisco devices, the Nexus devices do not support PAgP, and instead, offer LACP for a dynamic protocol to assist with port channel creation.

Each port can be in only one port channel. All the ports in a port channel must be compatible; they must use the same speed and duplex mode.

You can create port channels directly by creating the port-channel interface, or you can create a channel group that acts to aggregate individual ports into a bundle. When you associate an interface with a channel group, the software creates a matching port channel automatically if the port channel does not already exist. In this instance, the port channel assumes the Layer 2 or Layer 3 configuration of the first interface.

You can also create the port channel first. In this instance, the Cisco NX-OS software creates an empty channel group with the same channel number as the port channel and takes the default Layer 2 or Layer 3 configuration, as well as the compatibility configuration.

Your port channel is operationally up when at least one of the member ports is up and that port’s status is channeling. The port channel is operationally down when all member ports are operationally down.

NOTE: You can create a Layer 2 port channel by bundling compatible Layer 2 interfaces, or you can create Layer 3 port channels by bundling compatible Layer 3 interfaces. After you create a Layer 3 port channel, you can add an IP address to the port-channel interface and create subinterfaces on the Layer 3 port channel. Of course, you cannot combine Layer 2 and Layer 3 interfaces in the same port channel. You can also change the port channel from Layer 3 to Layer 2.

Also as you would expect, all ports in the port channel must be in the same virtual device context (VDC).

Any configuration changes that you apply to the port channel are applied to each member interface of that port channel. For example, if you configure Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) parameters on the port channel, the Cisco NX-OS software applies those parameters to each interface in the port channel.

After a Layer 2 port becomes part of a port channel, all switchport configurations must be done on the port channel; you can no longer apply switchport configurations to individual port-channel members. You cannot apply Layer 3 configurations to an individual port-channel member either; you must apply the configuration to the entire port channel.

You can create subinterfaces on a Layer 3 port channel, even though a subinterface is part of the logical port-channel interface.

You can configure Layer 2 port channels in either access or trunk mode. Layer 3 port-channel interfaces have routed ports as channel members and might have subinterfaces.

From Cisco NX-OS Release 4.2(1), you can configure a Layer 3 port channel with a static MAC address. If you do not configure this value, the Layer 3 port channel uses the router MAC of the first channel member to come up.

BGP Policy Course Arrives At CBT Nuggets!

September 11, 2018 at 6:07 pm

firepower

My latest course at CBT Nuggets is up! Woohoo!

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) – Cisco Routing Policy Mechanisms

This course consists of the following Nuggets

1. Module Introduction
2. The BGP Decision Process
3. Exploring Command Line Results
4. InQ and OutQ
5. IOS BGP Processes
6. Other BGP Processes
7. Table Versions
8. Clearing BGP Sessions
9. Using Cisco VIRL AutoNetKit
10. Soft Reconfiguration
11. Route Refresh
12. Using Distribute Lists
13. Using Extended ACLs to Filter
14. Using Prefix Lists
15. AS_PATH Filters
16. Using Route Maps
17. Using LOCAL_PREF
18. Using MED
19. AS_PATH Prepending

This course is a continuation of a series of courses on BGP. Here are the other courses available now!

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) – Basic Operations

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) – Peerings

Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) – Advertising NLRI

Cisco CCNA Data Center 200-155 DCICT Arrives at CBT Nuggets

August 29, 2018 at 6:07 pm

200-155

It is here! So many of you have asked about this course and it is now live on the CBT Nuggets site!

Cisco CCNA Data Center 200-155 DCICT

Jeremy Cioara is still hard at work on the other CCNA Data Center course (200-150 DCICN), but keep in mind if you are a CCNA R&S, much of that course (80% or so) will be review.

This course was an incredible amount of fun to create as it covers the very latest technologies found in the modern data center. The Nuggets are as follows:

1. Introduction: The CCNA Data Center
2. Introduction: Getting Your Hands on Equipment
3. Network Virtualization: Module Introduction
4. Network Virtualization: Functional Planes
5. Network Virtualization: CoPP
6. Network Virtualization: Stateful Fault Recovery
7. Network Virtualization: Virtual Routing and Forwarding
8. Network Virtualization: Default and Mgmt VRFs
9. Network Virtualization: Virtual Device Contexts
10. Network Virtualization: VDC Resources
11. Network Virtualization: VDC Context Types
12. Network Virtualization: VDC Resource Allocation
13. Network Virtualization: Managing VDCs
14. Network Virtualization: A VDC STP Example
15. Network Virtualization: Introducing Overlay Networks
16. Network Virtualization: VXLAN
17. Network Virtualization: NVGRE
18. Network Virtualization: You Down with OTV?
19. Network Virtualization: OTV Basic Operations
20. Cisco DC Networking: FEX
21. Cisco DC Networking: FEX Options
22. Cisco DC Networking: vPC
23. Cisco DC Networking: Configuring a vPC
24. Cisco DC Networking: FabricPath
25. Cisco DC Networking: Configuring FabricPath
26. Cisco DC Networking: Unified Switch Ports
27. Cisco DC Networking: Unified Fabric
28. Cisco DC Networking: FCoE
29. Unified Computing: Virtual Machines
30. Unified Computing: Hypervisors
31. Unified Computing: Installing the ESXi Hypervisor
32. Unified Computing: Using Hyper-V
33. Unified Computing: Virtual Machine Manager
34. Unified Computing: Virtual Switches
35. Unified Computing: Creating a Standard vSwitch
36. Unified Computing: Cisco 1000V
37. Unified Computing: 1000V Operations
38. Unified Computing: Shared Storage
39. Unified Computing: Configuring Shared Storage
40. Unified Computing: vMotion and Migration
41. Unified Computing: Server Types
42. Unified Computing: UCS Components
43. Unified Computing: Hardware Abstraction
44. Unified Computing: RBAC
45. Unified Computing: Basic UCS Config
46. Unified Computing: Service Profiles
47. Orchestration: Cloud Concepts
48. Orchestration: APIs
49. Orchestration: UCS Director
50. Orchestration: UCS Director Workflows
51. ACI: Architecture
52. ACI: Fabric Discovery
53. ACI: Policy Driven Model
54. ACI: The Logical Model
55. ACI: Programmability
56. ACI: Orchestration Options

The NX-OS CLI – Part 1

August 9, 2018 at 2:48 pm

In this video – we get you familiar and comfortable with the NX-OS CLI and NX-OS in general. This is the first part of many videos on NX-OS.

NX-OS