Part 3 of 4: MD-100 Windows 10 is Available

March 19, 2019 at 7:25 pm

MD-100

Overview

That’s right – another part of this fun MD-100 series is available. This part has some super-cool Hands-On Labs that allow you to practice and experiment with multiple Windows 10 machines in our own safe and sandboxed Cloud-based lab environment. No more getting yelled at for breaking a company workstation trying some new Windows 10 features!

Course Details

Here are the Nugget titles for you in this skills-based training:

Microsoft Windows 10: Connecting Devices

  1. Configure Client IP Settings
  2. Configure Mobile Networking
  3. Configuring the VPN Client
  4. Troubleshooting Networking
  5. Configuring WiFi Profiles 
  6. Configuring Remote Assistance and Quick Assist
  7. Configure Remote Desktop Access
  8. Enable PowerShell Remoting 

Hands-On Labs for MD-100

6 of your 8 Nuggets contain accompanying Hands-On Lab exercises. These permit you to watch me make configurations and then try these for yourself on real Windows 10 systems. After performing the skills demonstrated in the Nugget, you can re-launch your lab environment and experiment with your own variations of the technology configurations! Remember, you cannot break anything, so be sure to have fun!

For the two Nuggets without Hands-On Labs, you will watch Anthony Sequeira perform detailed demonstrations of the following:

  • Configure Mobile Networking – watch as Anthony configures the Cellular Networking feature of a new Windows 10 Galaxy Book 2. This nifty little Microsoft Surface Go competitor is a slick little machine.
  • Configuring WiFi Profiles – watch your instructor configure key parameters of Windows 10 to ensure that WiFi connectivity works just the way you want it to.

The MD-100 Exam

As I write this post, the exam has left BETA from Microsoft! Woohooo! Here is the official page for the exam:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/learning/exam-md-100.aspx

If you are interested in seeing the topics of both the MD-100 and MD-101 exams in an easy to view fashion, check out the post on my blog here. As usual, the GOLD exam topics did not change from the BETA:

Finally! New Windows 10 Exams in Beta!

Did Microsoft Make Windows 7 Too Good???

February 26, 2019 at 9:27 pm

I asked my followers – what is your all time favorite Windows Client OS? Here are the results!

Microsoft Windows

It is so amazing how many are still holding onto Windows 7 as the desktop OS! There is still an estimated 35% of desktops running that old OS. Amazing.

If you did not get a chance to participate in the poll – let me know your all time favorite client OS in the comments below!

User Account Control (UAC) in Windows 10

February 23, 2019 at 5:31 pm

User Account Control

This post serves as a supplement to my MD-100 training at CBT Nuggets! Enjoy!

I remember a friend at CBT Nuggets telling me quite boldly – “Windows was ruined for me when UAC hit!”

My guess is, it was probably around the poorly received Windows Vista when my friend formulated this opinion. Suddenly for him, Windows would interrupt his workflow with noise, some visual fanfare, and a question if he was really sure he wanted to do what he was trying to do.

In fairness to Microsoft, other Operating Systems take a similar approach – and this is a key element to truly securing the client.

Regardless of what you think about UAC, this post is meant to ensure that you completely understand it and that you can completely control it! For those of you studying Windows Server 2016 (or later), please understand that this post also applies!

Microsoft’s UAC helps prevent malware from damaging a PC. With UAC, apps and tasks always run in the security context of a non-administrator account, unless an administrator specifically authorizes administrator-level access to the system. Because of this security context, UAC can block the automatic installation of unauthorized apps and prevent inadvertent changes to system settings.

UAC allows all users to log on to their computers using a standard user account. Processes launched using a standard user token may perform tasks using access rights granted to a standard user. For instance, Windows Explorer automatically inherits standard user level permissions. Additionally, any apps that are started using Windows Explorer (for example, by double-clicking a shortcut) also run with the standard set of user permissions. Many apps, including those that are included with the operating system itself, are designed to work properly in this way.

Other apps, especially those that were not specifically designed with security settings in mind, often require additional permissions to run successfully. These types of apps are referred to as legacy apps. Additionally, actions such as installing new software and making configuration changes to the Windows Firewall, require more permissions than what is available to a standard user account.

When an app needs to run with more than standard user rights, UAC can restore additional user groups to the token. This enables the user to have explicit control of apps that are making system-level changes to their computer or device.

But what about controlling the interruptions of your workflow? Well, the amount of “permissions granting” you must do is configurable with four basic levels. Keep in mind you can also make changes to UAC with various Group Policy settings that exist.

Here are the four levels of control that we should know. To set the level is easy, just search for UAC and click the option to change the UAC settings.

UAC has a slider to select from four levels of notification:

  • Always notify will:
    • Notify you when programs try to install software or make changes to your computer.
    • Notify you when you make changes to Windows settings.
    • Freeze other tasks until you respond.

    Recommended if you often install new software or visit unfamiliar websites.

  • Notify me only when programs try to make changes to my computer will:
    • Notify you when programs try to install software or make changes to your computer.
    • Not notify you when you make changes to Windows settings.
    • Freeze other tasks until you respond.

    Recommended if you do not often install apps or visit unfamiliar websites.

  • Notify me only when programs try to make changes to my computer (do not dim my desktop) will:
    • Notify you when programs try to install software or make changes to your computer.
    • Not notify you when you make changes to Windows settings.
    • Not freeze other tasks until you respond.

    Not recommended. Choose this only if it takes a long time to dim the desktop on your computer.

  • Never notify (Disable UAC prompts) will:
    • Not notify you when programs try to install software or make changes to your computer.
    • Not notify you when you make changes to Windows settings.
    • Not freeze other tasks until you respond.

    Not recommended due to security concerns.

So, it is worth noting, an expert user that knows how to avoid invalid Web sites and bogus applications can never be bothered with UAC alerts and confirimations. But please note, they better be truly expert at avoiding such potential problems!

For more information on the new Windows 10 exams – check out:

Finally! New Windows 10 Exams in Beta!